Take a Look:

 

County Towns:

 

Look for Chick Pick:

Robin's
Best of
the Nest

 

Search This Site:

 
Advanced Search

 

Have Kids, Will Discipline

image

I prefer the term “discipline” to “punish.” It seems more humane, as though my goal is to tease good behavior from my bunch of miscreants rather than to exact vengeance upon them. Semantics aside, once they hit the four-year mark the gloves come off.

Once (maybe twice) I swore at my collective of tiny people. I know parents shouldn’t swear at their kids but, in my defense, they totally deserved it. Unintended consequence: instead of improving their behavior they learned several new phrases to share with friends. So I kind of get how cursing is frowned upon.

Incentives like star charts don’t work for us. Last time I did it, two of my kids were too young to read well so they had no clue what I wrote. I drew pictures of “Make Your Bed” and “Brush Your Teeth,” etc. But that led to a lengthy and joyless critique of my skill as an artist.

Then they meandered upstairs and played with toys while I screamed at them to brush their teeth. Thirty minutes later they wandered downstairs and demanded a star. Instead of acting on my borderline-illegal impulse, I gritted my teeth and applied a star each to their empty boxes. I mean, why not? I knew, correctly, it’d be the last star they ever earned.

Why this fruitless exercise? I read that parents – especially mothers - should revel in their child’s achievements and tactfully admonish them for their misbehavior, i.e. “Sally, what a great job cutting with Mommy’s new kitchen scissors! Not sure how you got them, but next time let’s make sure Billy’s hand isn’t in the way. It’s not fun for Billy and blood is messy… it’s making mommy nauseous… a little faint. But YAY for such a clean incision!”

Obviously, the man who wrote this pearl of wisdom is too busy writing books and star charts to spend time at home raising kids. If he were, he’d know that any practice discouraged by Children’s Services is far more effective than the nebulous prospect of 15 shiny stars and a sugar-free lollipop.

And where, exactly, did moms get overlooked in all of this? We’re supposed to bury any negative feeling, any semblance of emotion other than delight, and keep looking to the rainbow while the hurricane annihilates our sanity? Nah. I try, but I lack the self-restraint. If a kid draws on my sofa with a Sharpie, my instinct isn’t to praise them for their creative use of mediums and replenish their stash of drawing paper. My gut tells me to yell and impose a lifetime ban on video games and dessert. Or worse. (Note to Children’s Services: I’m kidding. It never gets worse than that.)

Yet somehow I’m to blame for not addressing the problem in an optimistic and constructive manner. The thing is, kids aren’t idiots. If they’re savvy enough to eat ice cream and not broccoli, they know not to smear mommy’s special face cream into their hair. I don’t need to congratulate them if they refrain from destroying my lipstick. I need to get mad if they do.

There are things we can teach our children with equanimity (“two and two is four!”; “If you study you’ll do well on your test!”; If you don’t feed the dog he will starve to death!”) And there are moments we simply can’t. True, there’s a lot of grey area. That’s when our parental instincts kick in.

But I like to think our periodic bouts of unrestrained horror help to develop our children’s unsung coping mechanisms. If we’re prepping our kids for the real world, they’ll need the self-actualization to deal with their mistakes and screaming women. And I, as a loving mother, want to give my children every possible advantage.

Monday, March 03, 2014 • PermalinkKids in Tow    Darien    Fairfield    Greenwich    New Canaan    Norwalk    Stamford    Weston    Westport    Wilton    
Share |